"In the factory we make cosmetics, in the store we sell hope."

Charles Revson, founder of Revlon, said that.

He was right, of course. When women shopped Revlon's catalog, they weren't buying lipstick, they were buying confidence

Revson was a good salesman. He knew his product. He understood it's purpose.

For example: 

  • If you own a dessert stand, you're not selling ice cream.
    You're selling a first date. 
     
  • If you own a luxury car dealership, you're not selling a Ferrari.
    You're selling status. 
     
  • If you own an outdoors shop, you're not selling fishing rods.
    You're selling lasting family memories. 

Charles Revson wasn't selling lipstick to his customers. He was selling them a feeling


Charles Revson wasn't selling lipstick to his customers. He was selling them a feeling. 


Want to tap into your audience's feelings?

Ask yourself this question before writing an ad (or anything for that matter):

"What am I selling, really?"

This question cuts through the clutter, illuminating your audience's perspective like a spotlight.

Most importantly, it'll help you start telling a story. 

And starting is the hardest part.